Between the Grooves with Philip Booth

Exploring Jazz, Rock, Americana, World Music and more

I’m Talking to You, StubHub (and the Likes of You)

with one comment

For a long while, I’ve been annoyed (to say the least) about the outrageous ticket prices offered by the likes of StubHub and similarly greedy merchants who work just this side of the law.

Below is something I posted on Facebook — some quick thoughts:

I hate the ticket re-sellers, who engage in what amounts to legal scalping.greedy

It behooves artists and venues (you know who you are) and TicketMaster to do a much better job of ensuring that people can’t buy hundreds of tickets all at once. Yes, there’s an official “limit” but there are ways around that, thanks to online trickery. If we can put a man on the moon …

Long term, the practice hurts the concert industry and artists, because it means that your average buyer can afford to purchase tickets to only a very few big shows a year.

But those making the most $$ from the system only care about short-term profits — what they can make today.

Free enterprise is one thing. If you buy a ticket or any other item, then you should be able to sell it for what you want.

Artists and venues together could and should devise a system whereby ticket re-sellers don’t have unfair advantages in purchasing the tickets in the first place.

(Artists bear responsibility, too, to not charge outrageously; more people will buy tickets at $50 than they will at $75, meaning that they can make just as much at a lower price point)

Rant over.

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Written by philipb1961

April 10, 2013 at 10:06 am

Posted in Uncategorized

One Response

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  1. As you note, this isn’t the fault of the ticket resellers – if the initial sellers like Ticketmaster made it fairer – that is, selling ALL tickets to the general public, not creating artificial low supply, etc., then ticket resellers would have much less profit to make. The resale market only really exists because of massive inefficiency in the primary ticketing market. Ticketmaster knows this – and won’t change because it makes a ton of money in both the primary AND secondary markets. Ticketmaster, who owns like 80% of the primary market, is the bad actor in this game.

    schmaydray

    April 14, 2013 at 11:25 am


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